Tag Archives: sexual health

Track your Orgasms…?

I recently read an article on Forbes.com, and wanted to share it with all of you. The feature talks about activity tracker “wearables” that may soon allow you to track your orgasms. (Now that I have your attention!) An activity tracker is a device that is used for monitoring and tracking fitness-related metrics such as running, walking and sometimes heartbeat or sleep.

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Imagine the amount of measurable data that could be gathered in regards to sexual health and sexuality with something like this. Think of that woman whose own physician has told her time and time again that issues with sexual pleasure are all in her mind. Being able to share information gathered by this device with your doctor is a good first step in opening up the floor about your sexual health. He or she isn’t with you every day tracking your sexual activity or physical response to intimacy and pleasure; this is an interesting way to allow your health care professional in on that world in a more scientific way.

It also could help increase communication among couples. Being able to openly look at the data gathered by this type of wearable could allow for dialogue that otherwise might have been uncomfortable. On another note, it could even encourage couples to be more intimately active – as we all know, practice makes perfect applies to all aspects in life!

The developers claim that you will also be able to track heartbreak (although many of us would like to forget that as soon as possible).

One wearable that’s been getting mixed media attention over the past few months is the Fitbit. Regardless of your view on whether they do or do not accurately track your heart rate, many do find this type of wearable a good way to stay committed to fitness. In my experience, I found that the FitBit helped keep me on track, get into juicing and make 2016 a year about becoming a better, healthier me – not just about losing weight. I’m hoping something like this new wearable could have the same effect on couples and help enhance sexual health and awareness in the process.

 

Our Growing Sisterhood

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For those of you who haven’t heard, our Pure Romance family has recently expanded into Canada after thousands of former Passion Parties Consultants have decided to join our company! I wanted to take this opportunity to extend a warm, heartfelt welcome to all of these amazing women who will be working with us to carry on our mission. I went through a similar transition when I was a Consultant years ago for Fun Parties. It was an exciting new chapter starting my own company, and I know that many of these women will feel the same way starting their new journey with Pure Romance.

No matter where we travel in this world, women still have similar questions, needs, wants and desires when it comes to their sexual health and intimacy; on the flip side, many also strive for more quality time with family, extra income and to be their own bosses. This is something that Pure Romance is proud to offer our Consultants and those who come to our parties.

IMG_2446We are all truly coming together for a common cause: to give women permission, and to empower other women to also own and operate their own businesses. I wish all of our new “sisters” much success as we join forces to work toward the greater good for all women throughout the world.

Click here to read about this expansion on Yahoo! Finance News.

 

“Addyi” to Add Hope for Women with Low Libido

Flibanserin, now referred to as Addyi to the public, is a drug that’s been under study as a non-hormonal treatment for pre-menopausal women with hypoactive sexual desire disorder; it’s expected to be widely available at pharmacies October 17.

Clinical Trials for Addyi have been performed on 11,000 women making it the largest ever for a women’s drug! These extensive trials found the drug increased their desire, decreased their distress and increased their number of sexual events. Importantly, the drug has shown minimal side effects compared to those for male sexual dysfunction – in fact, compared to most drugs, period. It’s time to trust pre-menopausal women with this condition (and the health practitioners who advise them), to decide if this is right for them. 

Although Addyi is often referred to as “female Viagra,” it works entirely differently. Unlike the blue pill, which increases blood flow to the genitals and is taken only as-needed, Addyi targets the central nervous system and is taken every day. Over time it alters the balance of chemicals in the brain, in a fashion not unlike what you see with antidepressants. On the technical level, it boosts dopamine and norepinephrine, which are tied to sexual excitement, while regulating serotonin, which is linked to sexual inhibition. This, its supporters say, increases women’s desire.

I’m so excited to finally see notable progress in this arena. When it comes sexual health research women are light years behind men! Men’s sexual health research started in the 1970’s – with 26 now approved medications for male sexual dysfunction. Although the FDA approved Viagra for men in 1998, and a host of prescription drugs since then, the FDA has not approved any medications for women’s sexual function. The FDA describes this as an “unmet medical need.”

“An unmet need…” I’ve listened to tens of thousands of stories from women across the world since starting Pure Romance; I can say with confidence, this is an unmet medical need in our society. Its passage is groundbreaking for women suffering from the disorder, and also opens doors for future research and advances in the field of women’s sexual health. It’s issues like these that motivated me to start the Patty Brisben Foundation for Women’s Sexual Health in 2005. Since starting the Foundation, we are proud to say we have raised $2.5 million for sexual health research. Yet, there is still more work to be done and a huge need for research and education in this field.

For women that suffer from sexual dysfunction and who are trying to make their relationships stronger, it can be heartbreaking. It’s not their fault if the sexual desire just isn’t there. 1 in 10 women suffer from Hypoactive Sexual Desire Disorder; while, about 5 percent of men in their 40’s suffer from sexual dysfunction. Women have come a long way in our society over the last century, from lobbying for the right to vote to successfully balancing family and careers. It’s time to talk about equality when it comes to the big pink elephant in the room – gender equality in the field of sexual health research. If you would like to learn more about this topic or the Patty Brisben Foundation for Women’s Sexual Health, please visit our foundation website.

Click below to watch my interview on this topic on Cincinnati’s Local 12 News below!

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Vaginas & Vulvas- What Do You Know?

Have you looked at your vulva lately? Yes, you read correctly! Many of you will probably say you haven’t, and many more would probably ask what in the world is my “vulva” in the first place! That’s okay. I was in the same boat myself before venturing out on my journey to expand my sexual health awareness.

I recently traveled with the core members of the Patty Brisben Foundation team to San Diego for the International Society for the Study of Women’s Sexual Health Conference as part of my continued hunger to keep learning! (Below is a snapshot of me with Aran Mordoh, Pure Romance’s Sexual Health Education Manager at the conference.)

2One of my biggest takeaways was the importance of consistently examining our own vulvas for any signs of irregularity. We are told by our mothers and the media from a very young age to take care of our skin, and told by our doctors to do annual breast exams at home, but how come no one has ever told us to regularly look at our our vulvas? We should be proactive about every aspect of our health and that includes every part of our body. During one session at the conference, they asked us to look at side-by-side photos comparing two vulvas – one of a woman in her 50s and another in her late 70s. Most would assume that the younger woman’s vulva would look healthier, but in this case, it was quite the opposite. It was fairly easy to notice and identify the difference in these two vulvas, but how do we know how to check ourselves when using a mirror in the privacy of our home? There is a great book called, “Read My Lips: A Complete Guide to the Vagina and Vulva” by Debby Herbenick and Vanessa Schick that will serve as a wonderful guide for learning about your vulvar health! Have you ever taken a look in the mirror and knew that you were getting sick? It shouldn’t be much different when it comes to recognizing the red flags associated with your vulva (as long as you know what to look for in the first place). We have to make the decision to be proactive when it comes to our sexual health, especially because it is a topic that people aren’t traditionally as comfortable discussing in public forums, and even with their healthcare providers.

Another big takeaway from the conference was a concept that I’ve been passionate about for decades, and that is the idea of “Use it or lose it.” Just like cardio is important to maintain our lung and heart health, we also need to make sure that we are actively “exercising” when it comes to our vaginal and vulvar health. As we age, our vulva undergoes a multitude of “wear and tear” experiences from tampon use to childbirth. It’s so vital to keep this part of our body stimulated, not just for the psychological benefits (such as helping alleviate stress and encouraging mental wellness), but also for physiological reason like preventing atrophy and dryness that can lead to pain in the future. Single people without a sexual partner might neglect to kegel or use intimacy products as a way to continue to keep their vulva and vagina “active.” Women in relationships sometimes wrongly assume that regular intercourse is enough; meanwhile couples in sexless marriages are also at risk. Whatever the scenario, it should be the highest priority to always stimulate the muscles in the vulva to prevent problems in the future.

Most women have been taught that they are never supposed to touch themselves, and they certainly were never told that it was a priority to maintain “healthy vulvas.” This kind of misinformation has been one of the biggest obstacles we have faced when it comes to achieving optimal health. By being more familiar with your body, you are not only prioritizing your physical and mental wellbeing, but you will also be able to better instruct your partner on what you enjoy. So do yourself (and your partner, if attached) a favor and pick up a mirror and the book I mentioned above to start the road to better health today.

Ladies’ Night

Ladies-Night“Sometimes it’s the family you’re born into and sometimes it’s the one you make for yourself.” -Carrie, Sex and The City

When Sex and the City debuted in 1998, it truly helped revolutionize the way that women felt about talking openly about sexuality, sexual health and intimacy products. Suddenly, it was okay to talk about your favorite product because, Hey, Samantha and Carrie could do it – and at a cafe diner in the middle of the day, no less. Charlotte, Miranda, Samantha and Carrie were just normal everyday women like the rest of us, and although we all tried to guess which character we most resembled, the truth is there was usually a little of all four women’s traits inside each of us! Continue reading